A Virtual Tour of the Village Today

by Jim Brown

On February 10, 2005, a group of former residents of St. Joseph's Village, who met on the Yahoo discussion group, got together to walk the long glass enclosed corridor for the first time in about 40 years.

I want to share the experience we had that day with you now. You are about to take a virtual tour of the place that you spend much time in as a child. You will see things that will bring back many fond memories and some not so fond.

Much has happened over the years. The buildings have been extensively modified, in some places beyond recognizability, and in some they remain so much the same you could feel yourself being a child again within these walls. To the best of our current knowledge, we will describe how the different buildings are being used today.

Please give the pictures ample time to load if you have a slow internet connection.


Look at that! As we approach the front entrance, the stone sign is still there with the words:

ST. JOSEPH'S VILLAGE
DEDICATED TO THE CARE AND EDUCATION OF CHILDREN THAT THEY MAY GROW IN AGE AND GRACE AND WISDOM INTO GREAT CITIZENS OF OUR COUNTRY AND FAITHFUL MEMBERS OF HOLY MOTHER CHURCH
THE SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY

PHOTOS BY JIM BROWN WITH SOME BY MICHAEL MUNZIAL AND KEITH ARANDS

After the Village closed it doors for good in 1972, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Newark sold the property to the Bergen County Special Services on the condition that it be used to help people. After making considerable modifications, the county opened several human services programs — a 110 bed nursing home, a substance abuse rehabilitation program, a high school for autistic children, and other programs for youth with emotional and behavioral needs.


Lets begin our tour.


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We would like to thank Harry Martin Maisch, Director of the Bergen County Health Care Center who was most helpful in our visit to the facility and the preparation of this feature story. We also thank the staff and residents who we came in contact from the nursing home and the other county programs that occupy our former buildings. Thanks are especially due to Don Heward, custodian, for going way beyond the call of duty to stay with us for many hours going into virtually every area of the complex. His knoledge of the facility and his enthusasim and love for the place was a great help to us.